Posts Tagged ‘insulin’

45 Years And Still Counting by Catherine P. Lawrence

April 24, 2014
Catherine Lawrence

Catherine Lawrence

On May’s Diabetes Late Nite podcast, the happy healthcare host, Mr. Divabetic interviews Catherine Lawrence about living with diabetes for 45 years scheduled for Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 6 PM, EST.

Catherine shares her experiences and insights of living with diabetes for over four decades and the changes in self-care she has seen over the years:

Many things have changed since I was diagnosed with diabetes at age 9 in 1969. Most of the daily testing equipment and testing routines at that time are so archiac now that I will fast forward to the present.

I believe that the standard for me is the counting of carbohydrates, which I learned when I started to use an insulin pump over 12 years ago. It is truly a way of life that I have found to be easy and so effective. Counting carbs was a very good new approach because a majority of the information I need is on the food label. The transition fron counting calories to reading a label that lists so much, including carbs, is simple and more precise.

Another large factor in my diabetic routine is the testing of my blood sugar. When I compare using a test tube and dropper then going to a machine that was the size of a tape player early on in my diabetic life, testing my blood sugar today is a piece of cake (sugar free of course.) The fact that I can test at any time, any place has simplified my life. And, let me emphasize how very important it is to test. To be able to get that ever important number, at a moments notice, can be a life saver.

Add to all of this is the invention of the insulin pump. For me, it changed everything. I just could not believe that there were going to be no more daily injections; no more having to carry around a vial of insulin (and keep it cool) and finding a “private” place in which to take that injection. I also learned that diabetes DOES NOT have to be hidden and should NEVER be an embarassment. It was a big adjustment with a learning curve that was very attainable. Commitment and honesty were essential in getting on the pump. It is an accomplishment I am very proud of.

Last, but not least, I TALK WITH MY DOCTOR. I let him know what is going on in my life so adjustments can be made when necessary. He wants to help but sometimes I need to be my own advocate when sitting in his office.

Along with help from my doctor, Certified Diabetes Educator, a Registered Dietician and support from my spouse (my husband has a good understanding and gives me input) I can live very well with diabetes.

Share your ‘Diagnosis to DIVA’ story with Divabetic and help inspire others to take charge of their diabetes. E-mail: mrdivabetic@gmail.com

WATCH NOW: Dazzling Diabetes Outreach at the Easter Parade

DON’T MISS: Diabetes Late Inspired by Doris Day on Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 6 PM, ESt.

FDA Looks At New Inhaled Diabetes Drug

April 4, 2014

images-1U.S. health advisers recommended approval of MannKind Corp’s inhaled diabetes drug, and said the experimental treatment could help some patients, especially those wary of needles typically used with traditional insulin therapy.

The Food and Drug Administration’s panel of outside advisers said that while the therapy, called Afrezza, did not appear as beneficial for adults with type 1 diabetes, it was clearly safe and effective for those with the more common type 2 form of the chronic disease.

The panel’s recommendation paves the way for final approval later this month of the whistle-sized device and sent shares of the company soaring in after-hours trading.

The FDA, which does not have to follow its panel’s advice, is expected to make its approval decision by April 15.

“There is a very important need for new treatment options,” said panel chairman Robert Smith, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at Brown University, adding that the therapy would not be suitable for all patients.

Overall, the panel of outside advisers agreed with the drugmaker’s argument that the inhaler offered a crucial alternative for many diabetics whose current treatment involves painful and cumbersome injections.

Panelists said the device could be especially helpful for type 2 diabetes patients, many of whom are older and may have problems giving themselves shots because of poor eyesight or arthritis in their hands. It could also help those who have an extreme phobia of needles, they said.

TUNE IN: Diabetes Late Nite  podcast inspired by the Sapphires hosted by Mr. Divabetic

Diabetes Time Machine Game with Dr. Bev

March 29, 2014

pod.001April’s Diabetes Late Nite guest, Dr. Beverly S. Adler PhD, CDE travels  back in time with us  to the 1970′s with her personal Diabetes Time Machine Trivia  in celebration of living well with type 1 diabetes for 39 years:

On March 14th, 1975: The Carpenters released their song “Only Yesterday.”

Also on March 14th, 1975: Dinah Shore’s television variety show featured guests including actors Alan Alda and Edward Asner, comic Pat Paulsen, country singers Marty Robbins and Loretta Lynn and actress Cloris Leachman.

Also on March 14th, 1975: Dr. Bev was diagnosed with “Juvenile diabetes”! She received my very first injection of insulin. It was a very memorable day for her. She knew nothing about diabetes, except that she would live with it for the rest of her life.

Diabetes management of 39 years ago was not the same as it is today.  Disposable syringes were available so Dr. Bev didn’t have to sterilize and reuse my needles.  But, the size of the needle tip was neither short nor as sharp as today’s fine pen tips. In those days, she only took one shot of “long acting” NPH insulin. Dr. Bev took the same dose everyday regardless of carbohydrate intake or activities. The only way to check your sugar was by urine testing, which was extremely inaccurate. But, she was grateful then, as she is today, that insulin had been discovered (in 1921) and that she could manage my diabetes.

DID YOU KNOW? In 1975, diabetes researchers in Edinburgh, Scotland, and London, UK, detected antibodies made by the body in people with insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1).  The antibodies occurred when the body’s immune system attacked the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroyed them. The pancreas then produced little or no insulin. The researchers discovered that type 1 diabetes is caused by an immune system attack on pancreatic islet cells.

Play  Diabetes Time Machine Trivia Challenge on April’s Diabetes Late Nite podcast scheduled for Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 6 -7 pM, EST.  Diabetes Late Nite podcast game contestants receive prizes including a Nu Naturals gift basket filled with diabetic safe, low glycemic. tooth friendly sweeteners, a Cabot Cheese gift basket and samples of Dr. Greenfield’s diabetic products  for hands, body, face and feet to moisturize and soften skin while reducing painful cracking and dryness.

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite podcast inspired by the Sapphires

Celebrating 39 Years with Diabetes by Dr. Beverly S. Adler

March 18, 2014
Dr. Beverly S. Adler

Dr. Beverly S. Adler

April’s Diabetes Late Nite guest, Dr. Beverly S. Adler PhD, CDE shares her own ‘diagnosis to DIVA!” story about celebrating 39 years living with type 1 diabetes.:

On March 14th, 1975: I was diagnosed with “Juvenile diabetes”! I received my very first injection of insulin. It was a very memorable day for me. I knew nothing about diabetes, except that I would live with it for the rest of my life.

Diabetes management of 39 years ago was not the same as it is today.  Disposable syringes were available so I didn’t have to sterilize and reuse my needles.  But, the size of the needle tip was neither short nor as sharp as today’s fine pen tips. In those days, I only took one shot of “long acting” NPH insulin. I took the same dose everyday regardless of carbohydrate intake or activities. The only way to check your sugar was by urine testing, which was extremely inaccurate. But, I was grateful then, as I am today, that insulin had been discovered (in 1921) and that I could manage my diabetes.

Interesting fact: In 1975, diabetes researchers in Edinburgh, Scotland, and London, UK, detected antibodies made by the body in people with insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1).  The antibodies occurred when the body’s immune system attacked the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroyed them. The pancreas then produced little or no insulin. The researchers discovered that type 1 diabetes is caused by an immune system attack on pancreatic islet cells.

The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial

Over time, my diabetes regimen changed and I started taking two injections of insulin every day. In those days, there were no support groups or social media to share the experience of living life with diabetes. Basically, you were very alone.

Diabetes management changed in a big way in 1993 after the results were published from the 10-year clinical study known as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT).  The study results showed unequivocally that keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible, by intensive insulin therapy, delayed the onset and slowed the progression of eye, kidney, and nerve diseases caused by diabetes in patients with type 1 diabetes. With this new information, my medical regimen changed as well. I started taking four shots a day – the new “peakless” insulin and the fast acting insulin before meals.  Some people did not understand why I had to take four shots a day and felt sorry for me that my diabetes had gotten “worse”.  No, no! I explained this regimen more closely approximated what a working pancreas does. This was a good thing – not a bad thing!

1999 to present

In 1999, Miss Nicole Johnson was crowned the first Miss America with type 1 diabetes.  I didn’t feel so alone anymore with her crowning achievement bringing diabetes into the spotlight. People started to become aware of diabetes. She was quite an inspiration for me.  I saw her as a role model of how to live successfully with diabetes.

In December 2001, I started my private practice, part-time, specializing treating the emotional issues of patients with diabetes, including children, adolescents, adults, and seniors. In 2002, I started my own web site: http://www.AskDrBev.com. By March 2004, I took the leap to a full time private practice.   In addition to focusing on issues of diabetes self-management, therapy also involved processing feelings of anger, guilt, depression, and anxiety regarding adjustment to diabetes, using my clinical training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). I provided individual, family, and group therapy sessions. I also spoke to diabetes support groups about coping with emotional issues.

In November 2009, I became a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). I started publishing articles in print and online, always with a focus on the emotional adjustment to diabetes. In 2011, I published my first book: MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Women with Diabetes. The book is a collection of life stories for 24 successful women with diabetes (including myself). The diverse group of women share their heartwarming stories and insights about finding balance between their personal, professional, and spiritual lives. In 2012, I published my second book: MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Men with Diabetes. This book is a collection of life stories for 25 highly respected and successful men with diabetes (including Ken Kotch). The diverse group of men share their heartwarming stories filled with honesty, humor, insights and encouragement how they triumph over their chronic illness.

One Day at a Time

Thirty-nine years have passed since that life-changing day when I got my first insulin injection. Although it sounds like a long time, it happened one day at a time. When you look at it that way, it’s not so overwhelming. I add up all the “one days” together and the result is 39 years. I’m most proud to say, on my 39th diaversary, that I remain complication-free!

Who could have predicted where I would be 39 years later? Diabetes regimens and supplies have been updated with the advancement of medical knowledge and technology. The Internet was invented and social media exploded with an active Diabetes Online Community (DOC). It’s common now to read about and talk about living with diabetes. Nobody has to feel alone anymore.

Who would have guessed where my career path would take me? Who could have guessed that one day I would be invited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, in 2012, to be a part of a panel discussion on “Women Living with Diabetes – Success Stories”? And who would ever have guessed that I would get to meet my role model Miss Nicole Johnson and present on the same panel with the former Miss America? It was a wonderful experience!  Who can guess what’s in store for my future? All I know is that I will live with diabetes for the rest of my life – and I will not just survive with my diabetes but I will thrive with it!

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late podcast inspired by the Sapphires http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/03/11/diabetes-late-nite-inspired-by-the-sapphires

Diagnosis To Diva: Cindy from New York

February 16, 2014
Diagnosis to Diva Stories

Diagnosis to Diva Stories

The happy healthcare host, Mr. Divabetic shined the spotlight on Cindy from New York, NY. Cindy’s a fabulous real life diva living with diabetes who we met  at last year’s American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo in New York, NY.  Cindy’s been living with type 1 and 1/2 diabetes for just over a year. Before she was diagnosed she said she felt tired. She was often forgetful and unable to focus. Cindy was also extremely ‘needle phobic’ and unwilling to use insulin therapy at first in the hospital.  Hear Cindy’s  amazing testimonial on how insulin therapy has greatly improved her health and life! Her A1C is now 5.9. She credits her husband of 26 years and her two teenage sons for helping her adjust to living with diabetes.

This month, we talked about “Labels” with inspiration from singer, actress  Fantasia Barrino.  From Designer and Nutrition labels to the labels we assign to ourselves as well as others – labels are a part of life. We use them to tell stories so we can better understand ourselves but often times labels can lead to confusion, branding and shame. The question is: are the ‘labels’ in your life helping you lead a healthy, happy life with diabetes?

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite hosted by Mr. Divabetic http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/02/11/diabetes-late-nite-inspired-by-fantasia-barrino

Diabetes Time Machine: 1930′s

February 13, 2014

DTIME.001Diabetes Late Nite podcasts feature Diabetes Time Machine Games to test your knowledge of diabetes history and make you aware of the many discoveries and advances.  The happy healthcare host, Mr. Divabetic loves to make learning fun with  diabetes self-care games. All Diabetes Late Nite podcast game contestants receive prizes including a Nu Naturals gift basket filled with diabetic safe, low glycemic. tooth friendly sweeteners, a Cabot Cheese gift basket and samples of Dr. Greenfield’s diabetic products  for hands, body, face and feet to moisturize and soften skin while reducing painful cracking and dryness.

Try your luck at February’s Diabetes Late Nite’s Diabetes Time Machine Game: 1930‘s. Put these 3 milestones in the correct chronological order starting with what you think happened first:

#1: The trampoline is invented

#2: A longer acting insulin is created

#3: The film debut of the Wizard of Oz

Did you know that there are 3 Main Groups of Insulins?

1. Fast-Acting Insulin:

  • Absorbs quickly from your fat tissue (subcutaneous) into bloodstream
  • Controls blood sugars during meals and snacks and corrects high blood sugars

 2. Intermediate-Acting Insulin:

  • Absorbs more slowly, and lasts longer
  • Controls blood sugars overnight, while fasting and between meals

3. Long-Acting Insulin:

  • Absorbs slowly, has a minimal peak effect, and a stable plateau effect that lasts most of the day.
  • Controls the blood sugar overnight, while fasting and between meals

DON’T MISS: Divabetic’s newest stage show, Diabetes Timeline at the ADA Expo in Pittsburgh, PA on Saturday, November 8, 2014. Register at diabetes.org

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite inspired by Fantasia http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/02/11/diabetes-late-nite-inspired-by-fantasia-barrino

ANSWERS: In 1934, the trampoline is invented by George Nissen and Larry Griswold. In 1936, a longer acting insulin is created . In 1939, the Wizard Of Oz debuts with Judy Garland

If You’re Afraid of Needles, You’re Not Alone

January 28, 2014
Divabetic's Diabetes Late Nite podcast

Divabetic’s Diabetes Late Nite podcast

Mr. Divabetic talked to guests on January’s Diabetes Late Nite podcast about what it means to be ‘BRAVE” living with diabetes. For many people, bravery with diabetes means facing their fear of needles and injecting themselves with insulin.

More people have what is called “needle phobia” than have diabetes. At least 10 percent of us have needle phobia, according to Dr. James Hamilton’s ground-breaking article, “Needle Phobia: A Neglected Diagnosis, in the Journal of Family Practice”.

If you have type 1 diabetes, you know you take your insulin injections or else. Almost all type 1s overcome their fear of needles. But, as Dr. Hamilton says, occasionally needle phobia can be fatal.

If you have type 2 diabetes, you won’t die if you forego injections. But you may well get sicker. While 39 percent of all people living with type 2 are older than 18 use insulin more would benefit from it if they weren’t afraid of the shots. Between needle phobia and the belief that insulin therapy is a last resort when orals fail, many type 2’s aren’t getting the control we can and should have.

Needle phobia often starts in childhood, when you receive vaccines and other injections with what look like horse needles.

Modern 31 gauge needles are so thin and short that you can barely see them without glasses.

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite Inspired by Sara Bareilles http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/01/14/diabetes-late-nite-inspired-by-sara-bareilles

Insulin Injections Could Be Replaced By Implanted Device

January 27, 2014
Divabetic Health Headlines

Divabetic Health Headlines

Human trials will begin soon for a wristwatch-size device which is surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity and releases a precise amount of insulin into the bloodstream. Supplies are topped up via a short tube which passes through the skin.

The implant contains a reservoir surrounded by a special gel which slowly releases the hormone insulin as blood sugar levels rise. As levels drop, the gel solidifies, ensuring the right amount of insulin is released.

Inventor Joan ­Taylor said: “It works like a healthy pancreas should, regulating blood sugar by releasing just enough insulin into your bloodstream. You don’t need to fill it up every day, so avoid painful daily injections.

“We are extremely close to embarking on clinical trials. Could the procedure to fit it be available on the NHS? Definitely – hopefully within a decade.”

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite inspired by Sara Bareilles http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/01/14/diabetes-late-nite-inspired-by-sara-bareilles

Being Brave about Diabetes by Dr. Beverly S. Adler PhD, CDE

January 16, 2014
Dr. Beverly S. Adler

Dr. Beverly S. Adler

January’s Diabetes Late Nite podcast guest, Dr. Beverly S. Adler  aka”Dr. Bev”, shares this blog post on what it means to be BRAVE living with diabetes:

The irony about being brave is that first you have to feel afraid, but despite your fear, you don’t let it stop you.

Nelson Mandela is quoted for saying:  “I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”

Taking that first shot of insulin is so scary to many people. It produces so much anxiety and fear. Even though there is no other choice when you become insulin-dependent, that first shot can be overwhelming. Consider the story of Cherise Shockley, a contributing writer in my book,MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Women with Diabetes.”  This is an excerpt from her chapter on facing the moment of taking her first insulin injection:

“My obstetrician-gynecologist decided he wanted to be in charge of my overall diabetes care.  I went home from my appointment with a bottle of insulin and a few syringes. I told Scott that I had to give myself an injection. He asked if I needed help and I told him no. I stood in the bedroom with my shirt pulled up and the insulin drawn in the syringe.  I looked at myself and looked down at my stomach.  I told myself that I could do it. A few minutes later, I was still standing in the same spot looking in the mirror, telling myself I can do it.  I never had to stick a needle in anything, let alone myself.  I didn’t want to hurt the unborn baby that I was carrying.  I called Scott into the room. I told him I was scared. He wrapped his hand around my hand.  I said, ‘On the count of five, we are going to inject the insulin.’

’1-2-3-4, I can’t do it.  I can’t do it.  Scott, I’m scared. I can’t do it!’

Scott calmly replied, ‘Yes, you can.’

I said, ‘Let’s try it again. 1-2-3′ I paused.  ‘Scott, I can’t! I’m too scared!’

Ten minutes later, Scott and I were still standing in front of the mirror holding a syringe full of insulin.  I was freaking out; he was very calm

Scott said, ‘Cherise, I’m going to count to five.  Then will insert the needle.’ I closed my eyes. Scott counted to five and injected the insulin into my stomach. I survived my first insulin injection with the help of my husband!”

Cherise’s experience living with diabetes, from her first insulin injection in April 2005 to the present, empowered her to be brave. When she became insulin dependent she found her voice and began blogging about diabetes hoping to inspire and help other people with diabetes. She founded DSMA (Diabetes Social Media Advocacy) to bring the diabetes online community together for a once a week chat about all things diabetes, support, awareness and education.  She ends her chapter in my book by saying that she is a stronger person because of her diabetes. I would say stronger and brave!

BUY NOW: MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Women with Diabetes http://www.amazon.com/My-Sweet-Life-Successful-Diabetes/dp/0984525491

LISTEN NOW: Diabetes Late Nite inspired by Sara Bareilles. Guests include Patricia Addie-Gentle RN, CDE, Dr. Beverly S. Adler, PhD, CDE, Poet Lorraine Brooks ,  SONY Music executive Jeff JamesMama Rose Marie and Mike Lawson from San Francisco, CA. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/01/14/diabetes-roundtable-inspired-by-sara-barielles

Braveheart by Lorraine Brooks

January 15, 2014
Diabetes Numerology Puzzle

Diabetes Numerology Puzzle

Poet Lorraine Brooks shared her poem, ‘Braveheart’ on the popular Diabetes Late Nite podcast hosted by Mr. Divabetic  last night. The action- packed hour of wellness was inspired by singer and songwriter Sara Bareilles.  Listeners were encouraged to be brave about facing their fears related to self-care with advice provided by the Charlie’s Angels of Outreach.

BRAVEHEART By Lorraine Brooks

To be brave in the midst of the storm
In the eye of the hurricane
When winds and tides collide
Crashing in free form.
To look danger and fate in the eyes
Facing pain and uncertainty
In larger and larger swells
And begging compromise.
The feelings of loneliness and sorrow
That no one understands your pain
The needle in the arm
And your fear of tomorrow.
Pills and potions and diets
Watching and counting and always aware
Making allowances for reality
But never to deny it.
This is the bravery divas express
Accepting life’s unknowns
While smiling and keeping the faith
Accepting nothing less.

Sara Bareilles’s latest album, “The Blessed Unrest” is nominated for Album of the Year Grammy Award. Her song, “Brave” is nominated for Best Solo Performance Grammy Award.

Throughout this wellness of wow podcast, we will be playing clips of Sara Bareilles songs courtesy of SONY MUSIC. The podcast also includes a Diabetes Hot Topics discussion, ‘Diagonsis to Dude’ stories, a Diabetes Numerology Puzzle, Prize Giveaways and a Mother Your Diabetes commentary.  Guests include Patricia Addie-Gentle RN, CDE, Dr. Beverly S. Adler, PhD, CDE, Poet Lorraine Brooks ,  SONY Music executive Jeff JamesMama Rose Marie and Mike Lawson from San Francisco, CA. 

COMING SOON: Diabetes Late Nite inspired by Sara Bareilles http://www.blogtalkradio.com/divatalkradio1/2014/01/14/diabetes-roundtable-inspired-by-sara-barielles


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